Under the Skin of War, by Chantal Ringuet: launch this evening   > read more...


Tuesday 20 May 2014

Chantal Ringuet, who has written a series of Letters from Israel on this website, has just published  Under the Skin of War (BuschekBooks, Ottawa), a collection of poetry inspired by the work of British photographer Don McCullin. The launch takes place this evening at Librairie Le port de tête, 6 - 8 p.m.

Down the Rabbit-hole, or, Jenny’s Adventures in the Mormon Book Scene, by Jennifer Quist   > read more...


Tuesday 6 May 2014


Novelist Jennifer Quist meets the Mormon book scene in Salt Lake City.

Interview with Fatima Soulhia Manet, by Annie Heminway   > read more...


Wednesday 30 April 2014

Fatima Soualhia Manet brings Marguerite Duras to life on stage.


[Photo: Yan Duffas]

Born in France, Fatima Soualhia-Manet is an actress and stage director. Working in Paris since 1984, she a co-founder and member of the theatrical group DRAO, which has staged five productions since 2003. Her video productions include Processus d’actrices and Traverses ou l’âge d’or de la Loco.
Soualhia-Manet’s current projects include an adaptation of Jane Evelyn Atwood’s photo book Too Much Time and Lukas Bärfuss’s play Quatre images de l’amour.

This interview was conducted by Annie Heminway, with the collaboration of Mathilde Lauliac. It has been translated into English by Zoran Minderović. The original French version appears on this site here.

Riding da Riddim: The Culcha Dancehall Clash II, by Maurie Alioff   > read more...


Thursday 24 April 2014

Miley Cyrus’s eyebrow-raising “twerking” is a bland white-bread facsimile of what happens all over Jamaica, every night, when the selectors program hot songs the deejays rap, and partiers dance until dawn, their moves as stylized as flamenco, not to mention crossing over into acrobatics and contortionism.


Rising dancehall queen Tifa at the Montreal Reggae Fest

Riding da Riddim: The Culcha Dancehall Clash I, by Maurie Alioff   > read more...


Thursday 24 April 2014

Reggae music linked up to the anti-colonial, back-to Africa, enlightenment-seeking Rastafari movement that originated in the 1930’s. It became the only widely popular recent music to transmit religious and political beliefs, and many other outgoing messages. Jah-struck roots reggae (or “culture,” pronounced “culcha”) works like gospel music.

Like a Beast, by Joy Sorman, Part II, translation by Lara Vergnaud   > read more...


Wednesday 9 April 2014


Joy Sorman 
[Photo: C. Hélie. All rights reserved.]

Part I of this translation can be found on this site here.
The original French text of Part II can be found here on Salon .ll.

Like a Beast, by Joy Sorman, Part I, translation by Lara Vergnaud   > read more...


Saturday 5 April 2014

Joy Sorman
[Photo: C. Hélie. All rights reserved.]

Literary translation is a seemingly impossible task – which explains why it is so fascinating. The English-language side of the literary magazine Salon .ll. is the go-to place for discussions which make translation possible. On its French side, Salon .ll. offers an excerpt from Comme une bête (Gallimard, 2012), a novel by the French writer Joy Sorman, side-by-side with an as yet unpublished English-language translation of the same text by Lara Vergnaud. The United States does not have the reputation of a country that translates a lot. Even so, literature likes to scoff at borders and there is no lack of readers, in the United States and elsewhere, when it comes to indulging oneself in the pleasure of discovery combined with the more intellectual exercise of comparison. It is to this subtle dialogue of languages that we now invite you.   

Marie-Andrée Lamontagne
Translated by Ellen Sowchek

Like a Beast tells the story of a young man, Pim, who loves animals. He loves them so much that he learns to butcher them. Perfectly. The author’s meticulous research helps carry the reader deep into the realm of its subject.

Pim is not the cerebral type; he is pragmatic and down-to-earth, ready to leave school and earn a living.  He knows he loves animals and wants them to be an important part of his life, so he becomes an apprentice at the butchery training center at Ploufragan in Brittany. It turns out that he is gifted in his chosen field. Butchery is hard and often difficult work, but Pim is a perfectionist; he enters his profession as a novice joins a religious order. He becomes increasingly passionate about his work, perhaps too passionate. Pim is not the only one who knows he is a different sort of butcher, that he is an artist of the flesh. Women notice that he can mold emotion and sculpt passion with his bare hands, and he soon gains a following not just with meat lovers.

Like a Beast shows us what the meat trade is really like, taking us, along with Pim, from livestock on the hoof in the stall to the slaughterhouse, and finally to packaging ready for purchase. It is a vibrant homage to handicraft, a poetic and metaphysical fable on the relationship between humans and animals, as well as a glimpse into a little known and rough, but fascinating life.

Mavis Gallant: The Writer as Rapscallion III, by Linda Leith   > read more...


Thursday 6 March 2014

III. Delinquency and Writing

The final in a series of three excerpts from a talk presented to the Atwater Library in Montreal, March 6, 2014.


Mavis Gallant

Mavis Gallant: The Writer as Rapscallion II, by Linda Leith   > read more...


Thursday 6 March 2014

II. Escape

The second in a series of three excerpts from a talk presented at the Atwater Library in Montreal, March 6, 2014.


Mavis Gallant, née Mavis Young
[Photo: Glay Sperling]

Mavis Gallant: The Writer as Rapscallion I, by Linda Leith   > read more...


Thursday 6 March 2014

 

Montreal from roof of Ritz-Carlton, 1925
[Photo: McCord Museum]
 
I. Only Personal Independence Matters
 
The first of three excerpts from a talk presented at the Atwater Library, Montreal, on March 6, 2014. 
 
 

Linnet, as in Linnet Muir, by Linda Leith   > read more...


Thursday 6 March 2014

To begin at the end, here is a coda to the talk I gave today at the Atwater Library in Montreal on Mavis Gallant.


Mavis Gallant at The Standard, Montreal

Living with the Ghost of Duncan Campbell Scott   > read more...


Wednesday 29 January 2014

Mark Abley's Conversations with a Dead Man is an unorthodox mash-up of sources, but it is this generic variety which allows the text to both entertain and succeed.

The Immortal Dany Laferrière   > read more...


Friday 13 December 2013


Salon .ll. congratulates Dany Laferrière, the first Canadian to join the Immortals 

[Photo: Louise LeBlanc]

Daewoo, by François Bon - Part Two   > read more...


Monday 25 November 2013

Part Two: Fameck, May 2003: Waiting for the mailman, and Sylvia

Literary translation is a seemingly impossible task – which explains why it is so fascinating. The English-language side of the literary magazine Salon .ll. is the go-to place for discussions which make translation possible. On its French side, Salon .ll. offers an excerpt from Daewoo (Fayard, 2004), a novel by the French writer François Bon,  side-by-side with an as yet unpublished English-language translation of the same text by New Yorkers Alison Dundy and Emmanuelle Ertel. The United States does not have the reputation of a country that translates a lot. Even so, literature likes to scoff at borders and there is no lack of readers, in the United States and elsewhere, when it comes to indulging oneself in the pleasure of discovery combined with the more intellectual exercise of comparison. It is to this subtle dialogue of languages that we now invite you.   

Marie-Andrée Lamontagne
Translated by Ellen Sowchek


When the Korean conglomerate Daewoo proposed setting up new electronics plants in the economically devastated Lorraine region of France, it seemed like a win-win situation. It would prove to be the contrary. Following revelation of accounting fraud, one of the largest in history, in which millions of dollars, including public subsidies were embezzled by management, Daewoo closed up shop and went home. And although the company's president eventually stood trial in Korea, it was small consolation to the workers left behind, their lives and livelihoods destroyed by the scandal.

Daewoo, an evocative historical novel by François Bon, gives voice to these (mostly women) workers who were the ultimate victims of this corporate crime. Based on documentary research and personal interviews with some of the workers, Bon has created a work that captures the very human and often tragic side of this drama. As he himself describes it, "If these female workers no longer have a place anywhere, let this novel be their memoir."

Presentation by Alison Dundy et Emmanuelle Ertel

Daewoo, by François Bon - Part One   > read more...


Friday 15 November 2013

Literary translation is a seemingly impossible task – which explains why it is so fascinating. The English-language side of the literary magazine Salon .ll. is the go-to place for discussions which make translation possible. On its French side, Salon .ll. offers an excerpt from Daewoo (Fayard, 2004), a novel by the French writer François Bon,  side-by-side with an as yet unpublished English-language translation of the same text by New Yorkers Alison Dundy and Emmanuelle Ertel. The United States does not have the reputation of a country that translates a lot. Even so, literature likes to scoff at borders and there is no lack of readers, in the United States and elsewhere, when it comes to indulging oneself in the pleasure of discovery combined with the more intellectual exercise of comparison. It is to this subtle dialogue of languages that we now invite you.   

Marie-Andrée Lamontagne
Translated by Ellen Sowchek


When the Korean conglomerate Daewoo proposed setting up new electronics plants in the economically devastated Lorraine region of France, it seemed like a win-win situation. It would prove to be the contrary. Following revelation of accounting fraud, one of the largest in history, in which millions of dollars, including public subsidies were embezzled by management, Daewoo closed up shop and went home. And although the company's president eventually stood trial in Korea, it was small consolation to the workers left behind, their lives and livelihoods destroyed by the scandal.

Daewoo, an evocative historical novel by François Bon, gives voice to these (mostly women) workers who were the ultimate victims of this corporate crime. Based on documentary research and personal interviews with some of the workers, Bon has created a work that captures the very human and often tragic side of this drama. As he himself describes it, "If these female workers no longer have a place anywhere, let this novel be their memoir."


Presentation by Alison Dundy et Emmanuelle Ertel

"I like to hunt down murderers and put them away." -- Luc Vanier and the Vigilantes, by Pamela Davison   > read more...


Tuesday 22 October 2013

Pamela Davison writes about Vigilante Season, the second in Peter Kirby's gripping Luc Vanier series of crime novels, launching today at Montreal's Paragraphe Books.

Mont-Royal métro   > read more...


Friday 20 September 2013

Just read this post from writer Will Aitken on Facebook, along with comments from other friends. Incidents of this kind are happening every day here in Montreal, prompted by the Quebec government's recently revealed "Charter of Values."
 

 

Connie Guzzo-McParland, in conversation with Linda Morra   > read more...


Friday 13 September 2013


Author Connie Guzzo-McParland

Connie Guzzo-McParland is the author of The Girls of Piazza d'Amore, a first novel published by Linda Leith Publishing of September 14th, 2013. Literary critic Linda Morra conducted this interview with her on the eve of publication.

Introducing Jennifer Quist   > read more...


Saturday 3 August 2013

Jennifer Quist is an Alberta writer whose first novel, Love Letters of the Angels of Death, is published today by Linda Leith Publishing. This interview took place on the eve of publication.


Jennifer Quist

A Midsummer Night's Dream   > read more...


Sunday 14 July 2013


Julie Tamiko Manning as Titania and Alain Goulem as Bottom [Photo: Repercussion Theatre]

This is what makes a culture, this kind of occasion, this play, this green sward, this shared delight, the company of all these friends and strangers. This is Shakespeare in the Park, thanks to Repercussion Theatre.

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