Launch of $50,000 Montreal International Poetry Prize   > read more...


Monday 28 March 2011

Asked to comment on the audacity of launching a global English poetry prize in Montreal, Epp says, “It’s not necessarily audacious. It’s certainly interesting. We think it’s a great thing for Montreal, not just for the English-speaking community.

Becoming a writer   > read more...


Sunday 27 March 2011

Email, the Internet, Facebook and newspapers – whether in print or online – are the enemies of writing. Reading is the enemy of writing.

The Literary Life (Part 2 of 2)   > read more...


Wednesday 23 March 2011

Writers are always complaining they don’t have enough time to write, even those who are “full-time” writers. I used to find that puzzling, but now that I have joined the ranks of full-time writers, I understand better. The question, “When do you write?” is not a silly question. This is why writers are careful to broach it only with close friends. The answer has something to do with what I write – and a lot to do with whether I write at all.

The Literary Life [Part 1 of 2]: A day to bottle?   > read more...


Monday 21 March 2011

Is there a way of bottling the good reviews? Steeping them in brine? Or, given the wintry day, flash-freezing them so that there they'll be ready to cheer me up all over again another day.

The Social Network: A good film, but not a great film   > read more...


Sunday 20 March 2011

Would anyone have bothered making The Social Network – or praising it – if it weren’t for the fact that Zuckerberg ended up with $26 billion?

From Tom Ložar: "It totters when she licks it with her tongue" / Trema se lei con la lingua lo lambisce   > read more...


Thursday 17 March 2011

Translation is not something we do for the lazy who cannot be bothered to learn the language of the original. Translation is so that you can read a poem you've already read … for the first time again.

Mavis Gallant, Home Truths & the Anglo Literary Revival   > read more...


Saturday 12 March 2011

The best stories I have ever read about Montreal are the Linnet Muir stories that appeared in The New Yorker in 1978 and 1979. Set mostly in wartime Montreal, the stories dip back into the more distant past of Linnet Muir’s—and Mavis Gallant’s own—childhood memories of Montreal in the 1920s.

"In Other Words" posts, Globe Books   > read more...


Friday 11 March 2011

From Samuel Beckett to Nelly Arcan, and from Scottish writing to Blue Metropolis, literary posts from "In Other Words" on Globe Books

Arguments for brevity, the possibility of wit   > read more...


Friday 11 March 2011

It’s not as though we have such precise notions of the length of a novel, which has been described as a narrative fiction of “a certain length.”

From Erika Ritter: "You're not Uncle Bunny! Uncle Bunny is good and kind!"   > read more...


Friday 11 March 2011

Who can forget Hancock's saggy, saturnine face in a bunny costume he was forced to wear while working as a toy store clerk--until he was outed by a child shrieking in a very English accent, "You're not Uncle Bunny! Uncle Bunny is good and kind!"?

.ll.   > read more...


Tuesday 8 March 2011

A place for different readers and writers to comment, and a gallery for photographers.

From far away, from right here   > read more...


Saturday 5 March 2011

It used to be that you could get better Hungarian sausages in Montreal than you could in Budapest. So many of the Hungarians have left, taking with them their flourless cakes and their cafés, so I’m not sure that’s still true, but others have arrived to take their place. Ingredients are now available here to make dishes from across the globe, and there are now Iranian, Russian, Georgian, Polish, Italian, Tamil, Vietnamese, Peruvian, Mexican, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Thai, Lebanese, and Ethiopian restaurants all within walking distance.

An Online Literary Salon   > read more...


Thursday 3 March 2011

On a situation comedy that thrived on BBC television in the late 1950s, the great Tony Hancock was frustrated by the difficulty of using a dictionary to figure out how to spell a word. The problem, as Hancock explained it in this particular episode of Hancock’s Half Hour, is that you need to know how to spell the word in order to find it in the dictionary in the first place.

This site situates itself in the space between what we want and what we already know how to spell out.

I invite you to join me here, in my own online living room, chez moi, to talk about everything books are about.


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