Salon .ll.

Welcome to Salon .ll.

Based in Montreal, with contributors and readers worldwide, Salon .ll. was created with posts in English in March 2011, and relaunched with French as well as English content in February 2012.

Salon .ll. welcomes news, reviews, excerpts, interviews, and other contributions on writers, books, and everything that books are about. Please query with your proposal.

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SALON .ll. ISSN 1929-0314.
Photo: Linda Leith. Founding literary editors of the French Salon .ll., April 2012: contributing editors Annabelle Moreau and Marie-Andrée Lamontagne (left), with directrices littéraires Annie Heminway and Ève Pariseau (right).

 

About a boy

2018-09-04 20:29:00

Leila Marshy's Q & A with Montreal author and journalist Frédérick Lavoie, author of For Want of a Fir Tree: Ukraine Undone (LLP, 2018) 
[Photo of Artyom by Frédérick Lavoie] 

 

 

Q & A with novelist Phillip Ernest, part II

2018-02-16 20:29:00

Phillip Ernest elaborates on his life in Toronto, the city to which he fled at the age of fifteen, on his first university studies there when he was thirty, and on the writing of the Sanskrit vampire story entited The Vetala that LLP publishes on March 10th.

Part II of a two-part Q & A. Part I is here.

 

 

 

 

Q & A with novelist Phillip Ernest, part I

2018-02-11 20:29:00

Phillip Ernest is a Canadian writer with an extraordinary personal history, as even the briefest version of his bio suggests:

Born in 1970, Phillip Ernest grew up in New Liskeard, Ontario. Fleeing home at fifteen, he lived on Toronto’s skid row until he was twenty-eight. He learned Sanskrit from the book Teach Yourself Sanskrit, and later earned a BA in South Asian Studies from the University of Toronto and a PhD in Sanskrit from Cambridge University. The Vetala (LLP, 2018) is his first novel.

This is Part I of a two-part interview. Part II is here.

 

 

 

 

Joy Kogawa in "A Long Journey to Mercy"

2018-01-16 20:29:00

This excerpt from "A Long Journey to Mercy: Joy Kogawa’s Gently to Nagasaki," by Irene Sywenky, was originally published in Confluences 2: Essays on the New Canadian Literature, edited by Nurjehan Aziz. It appears on Salon .ll. by kind permission of Mawenzi House.  

Joy Kogawa's most recent work, Gently to Nagasaki (2016), is a memoir that connects with many of the themes she has developed in her earlier books on Japanese-Canadians.

 

 

 

 

Publishing Translation in Montreal, II

2017-12-10 20:29:00

Part II of the text of a talk prepared for a panel on Publishing Literature in Translation at the Concordia University colloquium Traduire Arabe on Thursday, December 7, 2017.

Author Linda Leith with journalist Akim
[Photo: Akim Kermiche]

 

 

 

 

Publishing Translation in Montreal, I

2017-12-10 18:29:00

Part I of the text of a talk prepared for a panel on Publishing Literature in Translation at the Concordia University colloquium Traduire Arabe on Thursday, December 7, 2017.

[Photo: TAAM - TAIM]

 

 

 

 

Scottish Stones, part II, by Kenneth Radu

2017-12-07 13:29:00

I had read Andrew Lang’s collections of fairy tales as a child and later as an adult. In university I also read David Hume’s philosophy, which provided a pathway out of dingles and a ladder out of wells of wishful thinking. Through fantasy or fact, the geography of dramatic basalt rock formations, covered in green, obviously came into being through the forces of eons for the sole purpose of providing dancing venues under moonlight and feeding our insatiable need for stories.



 

 

 

Scottish Stones, part I, by Kenneth Radu

2017-12-06 13:29:00

“I tell you. I fell in love with a tree. I couldn’t not. It was in blossom. It was a day like other days and I was on my way to work, walking the same way as usual between our house and the town” (Ali Smith).

Well, I fell in love with Scotland. I couldn’t not, although flowering trees had little to do with it. 



 

 

 

Our Year of Mourning Leonard, by Ariela Freedman

2017-12-01 13:29:00

My father died twenty years ago and I cannot listen to Leonard Cohen without mourning him. As I write, I’m listening to his copy of Cohen’s album Songs from a Room. “What is a saint?” Cohen asks in Beautiful Losers, and he answers himself, “I think it has something to do with the energy of love.”



 

 

 

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