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From Elaine Kalman Naves: Peter Behrens' The O’Briens

Members of the eponymous family are so bicultural that their conversation often and readily slips from English to French. It’s difficult not to read into the author’s intent the desire to pen “a” if not “the” great Canadian novel.

Gaudy is Good: Bath and Brighton Pier, part I, by Kenneth Radu

Bath is beautiful in the way Brighton is not: sedate façades and iron palings, a vigorous river and splendid rooms, all contribute to a grand effect, the Bath manner, but one longs for the upstart and riotous, for colour.

Author Kenneth Radu on Brighton Pier


 

Walking Through the Trees, part II, by Kenneth Radu

Aside from necessary funds, restoring a landscape or great garden requires patience, understanding, knowledge, and a good helping of genius. Gardens, unlike pyramids or palaces, can disappear through neglect, financial collapse, or death of original maker. They are often staked to the fortunes of the families.


Eden Project, Cornwall

From Margaret O'Brien: John Vaillant's The Tiger: A True Story of Vengeance and Survival

The Tiger is a Poe-like thriller, an analysis of post-perestroika economic disintegration (with plenty of black humour included), a treatise on biodiversity, an overview of paleoanthropology, and a completely absorbing read. But its essence is an intricate and measured plea for humans to understand and value our co-existence with the natural world.

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