What's wrong with this collection of photographs?

In its ongoing interest in everything that books are about, or, to put it differently, on the literary as it intersects with just about everything, Salon .ll. rescues a remarkable set of photographs of Canadian Pacific executives from obscurity and asks its loyal readers: Can these photos help illuminate our literary discussions?

Patience may be needed, for these photos may take a few seconds to come into focus.

Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

More articles

The Decision to Publish in French, Part I, by Linda Leith


Abou Farman's Clerks of the Passage is one of seven books LLP published in its launch year, 2012.

In September 2014, LLP embarked on a process that has led, one year later, to the decision to publish books in French as well as English.

The first step was a grant application to the Canada Council, in which we made a committment to disseminate the results of the process. This three-part article was submitted in slightly different form to the agency in September 2015 as part of our final report to the Leadership for Change program. 

This is Part I of a three-part text. Part II is here.

For a Literary Salon

Contributing editor Marie-Andrée Lamontagne’s introductory text for the French online Salon .ll. argues that literature has never thrived as much as it does today, when it has all but disappeared from sight.

Translation by Jonathan Kaplansky.

Contributing editors Felicia Mihali, Marie-Andrée Lamontagne, and Annabelle Moreau planning the  
literary salon, October 2011.

          

        

         
Changes made to .ll. -- and changes to come

Introducing fiction and poetry in translation into English -- and, in the weeks to come, a new blogue in French.

Not to mention, it's easier than ever to sign up and comment.

Not to mention the books that will follow in the new year.

Photo: Phyllis Papoulias
Mavis Gallant, Home Truths & the Anglo Literary Revival

The best stories I have ever read about Montreal are the Linnet Muir stories that appeared in The New Yorker in 1978 and 1979. Set mostly in wartime Montreal, the stories dip back into the more distant past of Linnet Muir’s—and Mavis Gallant’s own—childhood memories of Montreal in the 1920s.

8-Logos-bottom