What's wrong with this collection of photographs?

In its ongoing interest in everything that books are about, or, to put it differently, on the literary as it intersects with just about everything, Salon .ll. rescues a remarkable set of photographs of Canadian Pacific executives from obscurity and asks its loyal readers: Can these photos help illuminate our literary discussions?

Patience may be needed, for these photos may take a few seconds to come into focus.

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More articles

Space for a Pen, part II, by Kenneth Radu

I think of Virginia Woolf’s essay and cabin, Vita Sackville-West’s tower, and Carlyle’s study, their necessary, self-imposed isolation, and wonder how Jane Austen managed to produce six scintillating novels, at least two of which are masterpieces, in the midst of the busy domesticity of a small house where servants and family bumped against each other crossing a threshold.


Vita Sackville-West's Tower and White Garden at Sissinghurst 
 
From Guy Tiphane: Letter from San Francisco

Can machines select the next book for you to read? In this view of the future, a book's DNA can be compared to your “reader DNA,” and the bookseller – no longer a human but a machine automatically channeling books to you – is guaranteed growing sales forever.

Rye Observations, by Kenneth Radu

Why a town becomes a gathering place of the literati is a subject for literary histories. In Rye’s case, it may well have been the seductions of the past, which certainly seduced Henry James.

Conduit Street, Rye

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