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Review: Smells Like Stars

In Leigh Kinch-Pedrosa's review, D. Nandi Odhiambo's new novel is "a swirling, dizzying, drama full of complex characters and high stakes."

 

 

Q & A with novelist Phillip Ernest, part I

Phillip Ernest is a Canadian writer with an extraordinary personal history, as even the briefest version of his bio suggests: Born in 1970, Phillip Ernest grew up in New Liskeard, Ontario. Fleeing home at fifteen, he lived on Toronto’s skid row until he was twenty-eight. He learned Sanskrit from the book Teach Yourself Sanskrit, and later earned a BA in South Asian Studies from the University of Toronto and a PhD in Sanskrit from Cambridge University. The Vetala (LLP, 2018) is his first novel. This is Part I of a two-part interview. Part II is here.

Do Other Canadian Publishers Work in Two Languages? by Linda Leith


The six titles LLP published in 2013.

In September 2014, LLP embarked on a process that has led, one year later, to the decision to publish books in French as well as English.

The first step was a grant application to the Canada Council, in which we made a committment to disseminate the results of the process. This three-part article was submitted in slightly different form to the agency in September 2015 as part of our final report to the Leadership for Change program. 

This is Part II of a three-part text, The Decision to Publish in French. Part I is here; Part III is here.

My Life Among the Ruins, I, by Kenneth Radu


The Erechtheion 

The Acropolis can lead to poetry or hallucinations of deities. I failed to see divinity, but I absorbed the beauty of the Erechtheion, especially the six caryatids forming the Ionic columns of its so-called Porch of the Maidens. Absorption seems the accurate term. 

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