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Q & A with novelist Phillip Ernest, part I

Phillip Ernest is a Canadian writer with an extraordinary personal history, as even the briefest version of his bio suggests: Born in 1970, Phillip Ernest grew up in New Liskeard, Ontario. Fleeing home at fifteen, he lived on Toronto’s skid row until he was twenty-eight. He learned Sanskrit from the book Teach Yourself Sanskrit, and later earned a BA in South Asian Studies from the University of Toronto and a PhD in Sanskrit from Cambridge University. The Vetala (LLP, 2018) is his first novel. This is Part I of a two-part interview. Part II is here.

Art’s Art: Arthur Holden’s “serious farce” Ars poetica

This is a fun play, and a satisfying play, ably performed and directed at a clip by Guy Sprung in this excellent Infinithéâtre production. Arthur Holden is a playwright to watch.

Noel Burton, Danielle Desormeaux and Elana Dunkelman in Ars poetica
Noel Burton (George), Danielle Desormeaux (Diane), and Elana Dunkelman (Naomi) in Arthur Holden's Ars poetica. Photo: Brian Morel.
My Life Among the Ruins, I, by Kenneth Radu


The Erechtheion 

The Acropolis can lead to poetry or hallucinations of deities. I failed to see divinity, but I absorbed the beauty of the Erechtheion, especially the six caryatids forming the Ionic columns of its so-called Porch of the Maidens. Absorption seems the accurate term. 

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